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More Onolicious Grinds – From Poke to Plate Lunches

In Hawaii, look out for ono grinds or “tasty food.” Eat like a local on your stay and try some of the different and unique cuisines the Islands have to offer. Here are a few dishes that you might see on menus and think: “what’s that?”
ono grindsPOKE:

Poke, (pronounced poh-kay) is ubiquitous in any local gathering. No party would be complete without a tray of the savory fresh fish. Poke means “to cut or slice,” and the dish certainly features precision blade-work to create perfectly cubed chunks of raw fish that is tossed with soy sauce, onion and other spices. If raw fish isn’t your favorite, there are other types of poke, including tofu poke or shrimp poke. There are also different flavors from spicy to slightly sweet using various types of fish, although ahi is most common. With all of the types of poke available, there’s certain to be one to suit your desires.

 

moreonoliciousgrinds_malassadasMALASADAS:

Originally from Portugal, malasadas made their way to the islands with Portuguese plantation workers in the late 1800’s. These donut-like confections are made from fried dough sprinkled with granulated sugar. Other variations have fillings such as chocolate or custard.

 

 

moreonoliciousgrinds_lomilomisalmonLOMILOMI SALMON:

This popular Hawaiian side-dish is often paired with poi. Lomilomi salmon is a mixture of raw, salted salmon with diced tomatoes and sweet Maui onions. Sometimes it also includes pepper flakes for a little spice. This dish is usually spotted at a luau or in the poke section at grocery stores.

 

moreonoliciousgrinds_spammusubiSPAM MUSUBI:

Spam isn’t native to Hawaii, but it certainly has found a home here. The salty canned-meat has become a local favorite, even inspiring an annual Spam Jam Festival in April. Spam musubi is the quintessential spam treat, consisting of sticky rice topped with fried spam and wrapped with nori (seaweed).

 

moreonoliciousgrinds_chickenkatsuplatePLATE LUNCH:

Plate lunch is as simple as it is delicious. It usually consists of white rice, macaroni salad, and a choice of meat. Popular meats are steak, garlic shrimp, chicken katsu or kalua pork to name a few. Some of the best plate lunches are found on food trucks around the island, including Oahu’s North Shore. If you don’t want to take the drive to the North Shore, check out Pau Hana Market on Waikiki’s Beachwalk Dr. to try food trucks in a permanent installation.

For more local foods that use taro, see our taro feature.

 

Photos by Darrell Ishii; LomiLomi Salmon photo by Wayne Shinbara, food provided by Fred Kalilimoku.

 

 

2 Responses to “More Onolicious Grinds – From Poke to Plate Lunches”

  1. Rich

    Some of the best secret places for plate lunch: Ichi Men in Cooke Street in Honolulu, L&L Hawaiian Barbecue at Ala Moana Beach Park, Papa Ole’s on the east side of Oahu in Hauula, and Hi Steaks in front of Food Pantry on Kuhio and Walina in Waikiki. You’re welcome in advance

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